Conquest Begins

Conquest Begins

So the few followers of this blog may have noted that my painting and playing of Warmachine and Hordes has slowed to a glacial pace. The good news is that a new set of painting, and now finally playing, endeavors have filled the void. I’ve been working very hard on a Nurgle combined force, spanning Daemons, Death Guard, and even Gellerpox Infected. I’m really enjoying moving back to modeling and painting Games Workshop miniatures–working with their plastic kits and the level of detail and nuance they provide for painting is just great.

I’m really pleased with how the big guys turned out, both Vulgrar Thrice-Cursed and the large mutants. These were a good start to my experimenting with Nurgle, as I’m wanting to use a limited color palate for the skin, tentacles, boils, and pustules, and a rotation of flesh tone, Nurgle flesh, and a pale lavender seem to be perfect.

The other half of the Gellerpox: all the bugs and bits. I’m liking the blue tone for scales and for wings, and think it gives some good balance to the models. Clearly I’m doing lava bases again, as I really like the effect and it ties together armies nicely. 

Horticulus Slimux, a cluster of Beasts of Nurgle, three Feculent Gnarlmaws, and a Daemon Prince (right now he’s running with the Daemons, but can be Death Guard as I grow my forces).

To get some games played, I’m joining a group of friends and participating in the Urban Conquest campaign rules. The groups are divided into Imperial, Chaos, and Xenos, with Imperial being the most diverse set of armies and players, me carrying the Chaos banner with our Slaanesh player, and the Xenos being a solitary Eldar player (well, Craftworlds/Aelderi these days).

Our first night of games saw my force, led by Vulgrar Thrice-Cursed, get trapped between an Astra Militarum (Imperial Guard) Cadian army. The mission required me to get a certain number of my units out of the ambush and off the far table edge. Nurgle may be slow, but my resilience and diversity of units really helped me get enough to safety. The only trace that Nurgle’s minions had been present were a few cultists’ singed robes, some dead flies and fleas, and a row of feculent gnarlmaws planted by the Grand Cultivator himself. A win for Nurgle’s forces!

Some shots from the game. A mutant stops for a snack. The Astra Militarum tanks fend off the tiny flying swarms. And Horticulus Slimux manages to shepherd off enough models to win the game. 

The urban conquest campaign rules are a pretty neat kit. Games Workshop continues to get more and more effective in their campaign structures. This one is great because it really focuses you in on the games–play them, and have fun, and get missions based upon your sort of grand intentions as a force each round (e.g. “we’re on the attack,” “we’re staying defensive,” “we’re scouting,” or “we’re reinforcing”). The sticker sets are more like window clings, so they let you reuse the cards perfectly. I ended up aiming at victory points over resources, which I’m regretting after the first round of the campaign phase. A bit more balance may have been more flexible. In any case, I’m looking forward to more games and more fun with these models and this story.

The other game of the evening saw the Astra Militarum going up against the Eldar. The Guard just narrowly edged them out for a win. The campaign system uses a set of cards to represent the city in which the conflict is happening–the skulls in the lower left indicate when they’re owned by a faction. Mine are hard to see–green for Nurgle!

Warhammer 40k Power Points Painted

Nurgle Daemons: 24

Death Guard: 0

Gellerpox Infected: 18

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